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Who's your receiver at No. 14?

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Logic suggests the Miami Dolphins will use the No. 14 overall selection in the 2015 NFL Draft on a receiver. Advanced logic suggests the Dolphins, if they do select a receiver, will take one of the big-bodied, wide-catch-radius guys available (maybe DeVante Parker, maybe not). Which receiver would you take at No. 14?

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Logic suggests the Miami Dolphins will use the No. 14 overall selection in the 2015 NFL Draft on a receiver. Advanced logic suggests that, if the Dolphins do indeed select a receiver at that spot, they'll take one of the big-bodied, wide-catch-radius guys available.

Common logic suggests logic doesn't mean a whole lot this time of year.

Yes, the Dolphins need a receiver--perhaps more than one. Yes, it makes sense--in a draft featuring a considerable amount of high-end receiver talent--for Miami to find franchise quarterback Ryan Tannehill a No. 1 gun as he enters his fourth year in the league. And yes, while the Dolphins this month added considerable pass-catching pieces in tight end Jordan Cameron and receiver wunderkind Kenny Stills, they lost significant pieces in speedster receiver Mike Wallace and the ultra-versatile Charles Clay. No doubt there's still work to be done regarding Miami's wide receiver personnel, but do the Dolphins need to dedicate multiple draft rounds to the cause? Does all of the above mean a receiver at No. 14 overall is a foregone conclusion?

Not quite. Not yet, at least.

First off--and this is the most obvious point--the Dolphins have no idea which receivers will be available when the No. 14 pick rolls around on April 30. West Virginia's Kevin White is a likely candidate to go somewhere within the first 10 picks, maybe the first five. Many experts believe Alabama's Amari Cooper is the most complete receiver available this spring, but will his lack of height keep him on the board longer than expected? What about Louisville's DeVante Parker? His mid-4.4 speed and excellent vertical leaping ability qualify him as the red zone terror the Dolphins have so sorely lacked during the Tannehill era.

As for the other first-round players, Central Florida's Breshad Perriman was thought to be a fringe day-two pick, and then he ran a 4.25 (!) 40 at his pro day workout earlier today. And then there's Oklahoma's troubled-yet-immensely-talented Dorial Green-Beckham. Is he worth the risk at No. 14 or even in a trade-down scenario?

If any of the above receivers are on the board at No. 14, one has to believe Team Hickebaum pulls the trigger with the intention of getting Miami's receiver corps one step closer to a lethal, complete unit. But what if the Dolphins don't feel that way, and instead believe they can find comparable goods on night two of the draft? And what about the "day two" wide receiver prospects like Miami's Phillip Dorsett and USC's Nelson Agholor. Though viewed as the second-tier receivers in this year's draft class, both could be off the board when the Dolphins make their second pick.

All of the above-mentioned concerns and variables aside, which receiver would you take at No. 14? Or would you trade down for someone else?