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Jonthan Martin bullying invesitgation moves to round two of interviews with Ted Wells

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The on-going investigation into the allegations of bullying and player misconduct that has surrounded the Miami Dolphins for over a month has progressed to the point where investigator Ted Wells is starting to re-interview players. Today, he is meeting with Jonathan Martin.

Robert Mayer-USA TODAY Sports

NFL investigator, attorney Ted Wells, has said he would need a "few weeks" to complete his investigation into the allegations of misconduct, harassment, and bullying leveled toward the Miami Dolphins by tackle Jonathan Martin. It appears those weeks will include a second round of interviews, starting today with Martin.

Wells met with Martin last month for seven hours in the lawyer's New York offices. Today, according to ESPN's James Walker, Wells will meet with Martin in Los Angeles.

After meeting with Martin November 15, Wells moved his investigation to Miami, where he spent a week interviewing Dolphins players, coaches, and executives. He is expected to return to Miami next week, according to ESPN's Adam Schefter, to ask follow-up questions there as well.

Martin left the team October 28, checking himself into a local Miami hospital for emotional issues. He then returned to California with his parents before alleging the harassment and misconduct on November 2, leading the team to suspend guard Richie Incognito, who appears to be the main source of Martin's complaints. The Dolphins and Incognito have agreed to extend the suspension until December 16, six total weeks, with four of the weeks paid. Last week, Miami placed Martin on the Non-football Injury list, effectively ending his season. The team is continuing to pay Martin while the investigation continues.

The second round of interviews is expected to include Incognito. Reports have also stated that Wells could look to interview former Dolphins players, such as tackle Jake Long, now with the St. Louis Rams. When the report is complete, it is expected to be made public.